Getting to Zero

Confluence Architecture was instrumental in turning an old 1970 energy hog home into a an efficient, low energy use residence.   The project qualified for $12,000 in  grants from CORE and $7,092 in rebates from Holy Cross Energy.      The home is fully electric and uses air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling.  It is projected to be net-zero. Confluence was responsible for planning, architecture and energy modeling on this home.

Before

           

 

After

      

Snowmass Village Energy Code Requirements

Town of Snowmass Village Community Development website here…

2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and REOP adoption…

Ordinance No. 2 2011  adoption…

Town of Snowmass Village CFA Maximum
Tier I 1000-3000 HERS 75
Tier II 3001-5000 HERS 70
Tier III 5001-10000 HERS 65
Tier IV 10000+ HERS 60

Link to Colorado Energy Conservation Code Hub for; Aspen, Basalt, Carbondale, Eagle County, Pitkin County, Town of Telluride and the Town of Mountain Village

Town of Mountain Village

As of August 20, 2020…

2018 International Energy Conservation Code

Special provisions for exterior energy use.

Permit fee discounts available for nonexistent or offset exterior energy uses.

Link to Town website and adoption language…

CFA TOMV yes snowmelt no snowmelt
< 3600 Tier I prescriptive prescriptive
3601-7000 Tier II 2018 HERS 60 2018 HERS 60
7001-13000 Tier III 2018 HERS 55 2018 HERS 60
13001+ Tier IV 2018 HERS 50 2018 HERS 60

Link to Colorado Energy Conservation Code Hub for; Aspen, Basalt, Carbondale, Eagle County, Pitkin County, Town of Snowmass Village and the Town of Mountain Village

New Home in Aspen Glen Completed

We are excited to showcase a new home we designed in Aspen Glen.  It is a 2500 sf, 3 bedroom home for a young family. The form of the home has 2 axis to respond to a challenging parallelogram lot. The home includes  indoor/outdoor features including an in and out bar window between the kitchen and rear patio. The master bedroom has a wrap around deck with views oriented towards t Mount Sopris.

     

 

A new home for Little Blue Preschool

Confluence Architecture along with local non-profit  Blue Lake Preschool  is honored to announce that after searching  for 5 years they were able to find a permanent location. Last September, Blue Lake Preschool  acquired the  property at 55 N 7th st, which happens to be the former residence of Mary Ferguson, a Carbondale icon. She was born at Spring Gulch in 1906, taught in one room schoolhouses, was a town council member, a volunteer and historian.  We find this connection to be a valuable  continuation of  Mary’s love of teaching.

Construction is now underway on the addition and remodel to to transform this 1950’s ranch home into an energy efficient  healthy and cozy preschool. Some of the energy efficiency  attributes include  addressing air circulation and filtration by utilizing a HRV system with Merv 13 filter, and upgrading  the insulation.  We seek to replace all the flooring with environmentally friendly natural linoleum and will use zero or low VOC paints.

Confluence Architecture has thrown its support behind this worthy project by contributing our professional services of  planning, property analysis, and Architectural services.  Blue Lake Preschool  is seeking funding to assist with construction.  This permanent home will allow Little Blue to increase the number of infant care spaces in Carbondale, a critically underserved demographic. We encourage all to donate to this worthy cause.  Donations can be made at Blue Lake’s website  https://bluelakepreschool.org/donate.

Town of Telluride Energy Conservation Code

Jump to Energy Conservation Code Hub for; the western slope of Colorado; Aspen, Telluride, Mountain Village, Town of Snowmass Village, Basalt, Carbondale, Pitkin and Eagle County…

Link to adoption language, Article 9…

effective February 18, 2020

Mandatory ERI path

2018 ERI 61 (zone 6)

 

Adopted the 2018 version of the IECC

c) Residential Energy.

(1) Amend Section R401.2 “Compliance” to read:

All new buildings and any building having an addition of 1000 square feet or greater shall comply with Section R406. All other buildings shall comply with one of the following:

The remainder of the section remains unchanged.

(2) Add new Section R402.2.14 “Exterior walls” to read:

R402.2.14 Exterior Walls. Recess step lights are not permitted in exterior building walls except where the required R-value is met for the wall assembly.

(3) Add a sentence to Section R402.4.5 to read:

Recessed can lights are allowed in ceiling-roof assemblies only if the required R-value of insulation can be met between the top of the fixture and the roof decking material.

(4) Amend Table R402.4.1.1 by adding to the Insulation Installation Criteria for the Walls Component:

Wood or Engineered Headers-R-10 wherever possible.

Steel Header – R-10 with insulation provided on both the exterior and/or the interior sides of the steel if possible, to maintain a continuous thermal barrier.

(5) Amend Section R403.5.3 to read:

R403.5.3 Hot water pipe insulation (Mandatory). Insulation for hot water piping with a thermal resistance, R-value, of not less than R-3 shall be applied to the following:

Items 1 through 7 remain unchanged.

8. Hot water line piping shall not be placed in an exterior wall to the extent practical. When not practical as determined by the Building Official, hot water piping may be placed in an exterior wall provided the required insulation R-value of the wall is provided in between the piping and the exterior of the wall.

9. An insulating blanket shall be provided that covers entire water tank fastened with appropriate tape.

(6) Add a last sentence to Section R403.7 to read:

Systems shall be designed by a certified Mechanical Engineer for single family residential structures greater than 2,000 sq. ft. of gross floor area including the basement area.

(7) Amend Section R406.1 to add to the following as the last sentence:

ERI refers to the ERI Home Energy Rating System (HERS) score.

(d) Additional Requirements for Residential and Commercial Buildings.

(1) Cement. All cement used within the Town shall be mixed with western coal fly ash, except such a mix is not required for exterior slabs.
(2) Low Volatile Organic Compounds (“VOC”). The general contractor and the property owner shall sign the Homeowner VOC Awareness Checklist provided by the Town prior to the issuance of a certificate of occupancy for a project.
(3) Energy Star Ratings. Energy Star rated appliances, exhaust fans and light fixtures shall be installed.
(4) Exterior vegetation irrigation systems shall be installed with a moisture sensor and timer to control irrigation.

(5) Pools and Spas (Hot Tubs).

a. Exterior swimming pools are prohibited in Telluride unless otherwise approved by the Planning and Zoning Commission pursuant to the use permitted on review development review process contained in the Telluride Land Use Code.
b. Pools, custom-built hot tubs, or factory-built portable spas shall also meet the Energy Mitigation Program requirements in Section 15-9-40.
c. Pools, custom-built hot tubs, or factory-built portable spas shall be equipped with a vapor-retardant pool cover on or at the water surface. Pools/spas capable of being heated above 90 degrees F must have a pool cover with a minimum insulation value of R-16.
(6) Garage door for heated garages shall have a value of R-18.
(7) Electrical resistance heating in living space is prohibited except for (a) the replacement of an existing system that is not subject to meeting the requirements of the Energy Code as provided in Subsection (c) of this Section; or (b) for heating small spaces less than one hundred (100) square feet.
(8) Mechanical Systems. Roofs shall be designed to not need electric underlayment mat heating unless approved by the Building Official and shall require temperature and moisture sensors.
(9) Snow- and ice-melting systems shall include automatic controls configured to shut off the system when the pavement temperature is above fifty (50) degrees F (ten (10) degrees C) and precipitation is not falling, and an automatic or manual control that is configured to shut off when the outdoor temperature is above forty (40) degrees F (four (4) degrees C). Electric resistance snow/ice melt systems are prohibited except for the heat tracing of gutters and associated downspouts. Snow/ice melt systems (except roof or gutter heat tracing) shall also meet the Energy Mitigation Program requirements in Section 15-9-40.
(10) Construction Waste. All sites shall have at least two (2) lockable bear-proof polycarts for (a) food items and (b) recyclables.

(11) Renewable Energy.One hundred percent (100%) of the building’s electricity use must be provided for with renewable energy, either produced on site or purchased through a Green Power Production Program. Creative alternative options will be considered by the Building Department. (Ord. 1502 §1, 2020)

 

Jump to Energy Conservation Code Hub for; the western slope of Colorado; Aspen, Telluride, Mountain Village, Town of Snowmass Village, Basalt, Carbondale, Pitkin and Eagle County…

 

Colorado Energy Conservation Code Hub

One stop for energy code information on the multiple jurisdictions of the Roaring Fork Valley, Telluride and Mountain Village.

I will try to keep this list current.

Aspen

Jump to Aspen Colorado’s energy conservation code compliance page…

Basalt

Jump to Basalt Colorado’s energy conservation code compliance page…

Carbondale

Jump to Carbondale Colorado’s energy conservation code compliance page…

Eagle County

Jump to Eagle County Colorado’s energy conservation code compliance page…

Pitkin County

Jump to Pitkin County’s energy conservation code compliance page…

Town of Snowmass Village

Jump to TOSV’s energy conservation code compliance page…

Town of Telluride

Jump to Town of Telluride Colorado’s energy conservation code compliance page…

Town of Mountain Village

Jump to TOMV energy code compliance page…

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pitkin County, Colorado’s energy code addendum

These are the rules to best of our knowledge.

The entire “Matrix” code was repealed with the adoption of the current energy code.
Gone are the tiers for size and glazing area. Gone are the sustainable building practices.
The rules below are for structures permitted after 4-22-20

New residential structures of any size:

For permit submittals… Prescriptive, Total UA and the Performance Paths have been deleted. Projects must use the ERI compliance path. And the ERI maximums have been modified to be 2015 ERI 60 before photovoltaic solar energy is applied, and 2015 ERI 30 afterwards.

Mandatory requirements

  • R402.4.2 Building envelope air tightness and insulation installation shall be demonstrated to comply with the testing option section R402.4.2.1.
  • R402.4.3 New wood-burning fireplaces and gas log fireplaces shall have gasketed doors and outdoor combustion air.
  • R402.5.1 Recessed luminaires must be of the shallow depth configuration and a minimum of 50% of the required insulation R-value must remain in place above the luminaire including any required separation or air space.
  • R403.2 All multiple boiler installations must be sequentially stage.
    • Any multiple boiler installations, or hydronic system consisting of more than five (5) zones will require commissioning with a full summary report provided to the building department.
    • All new boilers installed in Pitkin County will meet a minimum of 92% AFUE (Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency).
  • R403.7 All Gas fired furnaces shall meet a minimum 92% AFUE.
    • All HVAC equipment will meet a minimum SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) rating of 14.
  • R407 Whole Project Energy Budget and Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Section
  • R407.1  This section establishes criteria for the Whole Project Energy Budget through the Renewable Energy Mitigation Program.
  • Appendix A 101.1.1 Home Energy Performance will be predicted by the rating software and Energy Rating Index (ERI) certification. All homes will be required to meet a maximum of ERI 60, prior to application of renewable energy production. Per the “Pitkin County REMP Calculation Sheet,” all homes will be required to meet ERI 30, or provide offset per the Calculation Sheet, or comply with Section 108 (hardship).

Additions, remodels, and heated accessory structures:

For permit submittals…

Option 1  Prescriptive Modified table 402.1.2 from the 2015 IECC including U-factors of .28 for exterior glazing and .40 for skylights (and better) or a weighted average meeting those values.

Option 2 Total UA Passing a 2015 ResCheck using glazing U-factors of .28 for exterior glazing, .40 for skylights, and continuous exterior insulation. Continuous exterior insulation requirement may be waived if proven non-feasible, existing exterior wall assemblies remain unchanged or existing siding remains unchanged.

Mandatory requirements

  • R402.4.2 Building envelope air tightness and insulation installation shall be demonstrated to comply with the testing option section R402.4.2.1.
  • R402.4.3 New wood-burning fireplaces and gas log fireplaces shall have gasketed doors and outdoor combustion air. Modifications should not be made to listed and labeled factory built fireplaces unless approved by the manufacturer.
  • R402.5.1 Recessed luminaires must be of the shallow depth configuration and a minimum of 50% of the required insulation R-value must remain in place above the luminaire including any required separation or air space.
  • R403.2 All multiple boiler installations must be sequentially stage.
    • Any multiple boiler installations, or hydronic system consisting of more than five (5) zones will require commissioning with a full summary report provided to the building department.
    • All new boilers installed in Pitkin County will meet a minimum of 92% AFUE (Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency).
  • R403.7 All Gas fired furnaces shall meet a minimum 92% AFUE.
    • All HVAC equipment will meet a minimum SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) rating of 14.
  • R407 Whole Project Energy Budget and Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Section
  • R407.1  This section establishes criteria for the Whole Project Energy Budget through the Renewable Energy Mitigation Program (Appendix A).
  • R501.1.1 For alteration/additions greater than 1000 square feet, an air infiltration (blower door) test is required prior to commencement of the alteration/addition and a final air infiltration test prior to final building inspection must demonstrate a fifteen (15) percent leakage reduction or compliance with Appendix A.
  • R503.1.1 existing cavities shall be required to meet prescriptive code minimums whenever feasible. The insulation R-value shall be required to meet prescriptive code minimums whenever feasible.

 

Commercial buildings:

Building thermal envelope -2015 IECC prescriptive table or pass a 2015 ComCheck thermal envelope compliance report.

Lighting -Pass a 2015 ComCheck Interior and exterior lighting compliance report.

Mechanical -Pass a 2015 ComCheck mechanical compliance report.

REMP, CREMP & GREMP

Renewable Energy Mitigation Program (REMP) payment option is voluntary. Applicants interested in exterior energy use systems can alternatively choose to produce on-site renewable energy (Section 301) with solar photovoltaics and/or solar hot water, ground-source heat pumps or micro-hydro. Download Pitkin County REMP Calculation Sheet

  • Appendix A 101.1.2 Exterior Energy Uses. Residential, Commercial, and Governmental exterior energy uses
    1. Snowmelt (ie: driveways, patios, walkways, etc.)
    2. Exterior pools
    3. Exterior spas
    4. Electric heat tape for melting of roofs, gutters, downspouts, exterior piping etc.
  • Appendix A 101.1.3 Onsite Renewable Credits. Credits for renewable energy production will be calculated and applied per “Pitkin County REMP Calculation Sheet” for energy generated onsite. Renewable energy methods listed in the calculator include: solar electric panels (aka. Solar photovoltaic, PV), solar thermal arrays, ground source heat pumps (GSHPs), hydroelectric and wind power. Provision for alternative method calculations, including offsite renewable energy methods, is also provided, but will require specific review and approval by the Building Official.
  • Appendix A Section 101.2.1. Snowmelt systems:
    1. The maximum area of snowmelt is capped at 6,000 square feet per parcel.
    2. R-15 insulation shall be installed under all areas to be snowmelted.
    3. Required snowmelt controls. All systems are required to have automated controls to limit operation to when moisture is present, outdoor air temperature is below 40F and above 20F, and the slab temperature sensing. Idling of residential slabs is not allowed, but is allowed in commercial projects where public safety is a factor.
    4. Snowmelt heating appliances will have a minimum efficiency of 92% AFUE. Electric resistance and heat pump heaters will be allowed. Where condensing boilers are used, the boiler supply water temperature shall be a maximum of 130F to allow for efficient boiler operation.
  • Appendix A 101.2.2. Exterior pools:
    1. Pool covers are required for all pools, with a minimum R-value of 2.
    2. Pool heating appliances will have a minimum efficiency of 92% AFUE. Electric resistance and heat pump heaters will be allowed. Where condensing boilers are used, the boiler supply water temperature shall be a maximum of 130F to allow for efficient boiler operation.
  • Appendix A 101.2.3. Exterior spas:
    1. Spa covers are required for all spas, with a minimum R-value of 12. 2.
    2. Package spas less than 64 ft2 are exempt.
  • 3. A maximum of (1) spa per property is allowed to be exempt.
  • 4. Spa heating appliances will have a minimum efficiency of 92% AFUE. Electric resistance and heat pump heaters will be allowed. Where condensing boilers are used, the boiler supply water temperature shall be a maximum of 130F to allow for efficient boiler operation.
  • Appendix A 101.2.4 Electric heat tape controls. Electric roof and gutter deicing systems shall include automatic controls capable of shutting off the system when outdoor temperature is above 40F and below 25 F, and which limit the use of the system to daylight hours by means of a programmable timer or automated clock.
  • Appendix A 101.2.5 Hydronic roof and gutter deicing systems. These systems shall be considered snowmelt systems and shall comply with Appendix A.
  • Appendix A 102 REMP Fee Payment. No refund of fee payment shall be made to an applicant for installation of renewable energy production that exceeds the on-site renewable credits required pursuant to Appendix A. All monies collected pursuant to this section shall be recorded in a separate fund and shall be spent in accordance with a joint resolution by the Aspen City Council and Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners. The proceeds of this fee will be used to reduce fossil fuel generated energy consumption in other improvements in Pitkin County, to administer the International Energy Conservation Code provisions adopted into the Pitkin County Code, to educate the development industry and the public at large of the methods of energy efficient construction practices and the benefits of energy conservation and to achieve the goals of the Pitkin County Climate Action Plan.
  • Appendix A  103 Pre-Existing Systems. Pre-existing systems, for which a prior REMP fee was paid, regulated by the scope of this section sought to be replaced by an Applicant, shall receive a pro-rated credit calculated as a fraction of the number of years since prior REMP payment for the system divided by 20 years. For example, a REMP payment made for a system permitted 10 years prior to the current replacement permit submittal would receive credit for ½ of the prior REMP payment and that amount shall be deducted from REMP payment owed for replacement system.
    For renewable systems installed on site, full credit will be given for up to 20 years after the date of installation. Credits will only be applied to properly permitted and functioning systems within the scope of the adopted Energy Code and applicable Mechanical and Electrical Codes. Systems installed prior to 20 years before the date of permit application are not eligible for pro-ration of system credits.
    Upgrades to existing mechanical equipment (boilers, heat pumps, HVAC equipment, etc.) or renewables energy systems will not require a re-submittal to the application program. However, additions to or replacement of exterior energy uses (as listed above in Section 101.1.2), or additions of 1,000ft2 or more will require re-submittal of the appropriate REMP compliance documents.
  • Appendix A 104 Solar Photovoltaic Systems. System designer/installer must be certified by COSEIA (Colorado Solar Energy Industries Association) or NABCEP, (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners), or a licensed Professional Engineer in the State of Colorado.
  • Appendix A 105 Solar Hot Water. The size of solar hot water systems is limited to 500 square feet of collector area absent approval by the Building Official. Systems larger than this limit will be considered, but will require documentation showing year-round utilization of this larger system.
  • Appendix A 106 Ground Source Heat Pump. In order to use a GSHP for on-site renewable credit the GSHP system must supply at least 20% of the peak load for heating the building and all the exterior energy uses. Each ground source heat pump system shall be tested and balanced and the design engineer shall certify in writing that it meets or exceeds a design coefficient of performance of 3.0 inclusive of source pump power. Design conditions for determining COP will be: 30F ground loop temperature measured at the GSHP inlet, and 110F GSHP load side outlet.
    The ground loop system must be designed by a CGD (Certified GeoExchange Designer certified by the Association of Energy Engineers) or a Professional Engineer licensed in the State of Colorado or an IGSHPA (International Ground Source Heat Pump Association) certified designer. The mechanical system must be installed by a certified IGSHPA contractor.
  • Appendix A 107 Energy Consumption Aggregated Information. The Building Official seeks to track the progress of the program through submitted energy bills or information regarding residential energy use from other sources. To assist with this program-wide measurement, Applicant is requested provide completed release forms for applicable Utility Providers (electric and gas for properties which have both services). Energy consumption information will be used to monitor program success on an aggregated basis, and not for distribution with property identifying markers attached.
  • Appendix A 108 Hardship. Applicant may apply to the Building Official for a full or partial variance of the requirements of Appendix A. Applicant must show undue hardship and that the requirements of Appendix A disproportionately burden the Applicant if applied to a specific piece of property and typical onsite or offsite mitigation methods are not feasible. The Building Official shall evaluate the application for waiver of requirements of Appendix A pursuant to criteria developed in the Community Development Manual and shall only approve a variance where application of Appendix A will cause undue hardship upon the owner of such property which cannot be mitigated, and the granting of relief from the strict application of Appendix A will not cause substantial detriment to the public good and will not substantially impair the intent and purpose of the Pitkin County Code Title 11. Applicant may appeal any denial under this section to the Board of County Commissioners.
  • Appendix A 201 Governmental Renewable Exterior Energy Mitigation Program (GREMP)
    Local, State and Federal Government Buildings and Structures may be exempted from mitigation payments and offsets defined previously in this code for a percentage of the requested snowmelt when there is a demonstrated risk to public safety related to snow and ice removal.
    The following items and any related documentation will be reviewed and evaluated to determine the potential exemption. A percentage of exempted area will be determined and any remaining requested snowmelt will need to be paid for or mitigated in the typical format. Upon recommendation by the Chief Building Official, a formal request will be compiled by the Applicant and presented to the Board of County Commissioners for final approval at a regularly scheduled meeting.
  • Appendix A 201.1 An application for review and approval would include the following:
    1. Demonstration and declaration that typical mitigation methods were researched and proven not feasible.
    2. Demonstration that the public service being provided by the entity applying offsets the energy consumption being requested in this application including any cumulative offset exemption requests for REMP mitigation. (ie: Bus Service vs. Vehicle Traffic)
    3. Demonstration of safety risk to the General Public if exterior snowmelt is not installed including:
    a. Providing the ratio of total paved area vs. snowmelted pavement;
    b. Illustrating that the project minimizes the total amount of exterior energy used; and
    c. The installation of snowmelt only in critical public safety areas.
    4. Demonstration that BTU’s saved through other means (existing equipment upgrades, envelope improvements, or other energy saving measures) translate to mitigation BTU’s for snowmelt credit. Examples include:
    a. Hybrids
    b. Wind Power
    c. Hydro-Electric
    d. Waste Oil Boilers
    e. Pellet Boilers
    5. Demonstration that offsite mitigation alternatives have been considered at other offsite locations within Pitkin County for the installation of typical mitigation methods.
    a. Typical Ground Source Heat Pump, Solar, or Photovoltaic methods that are not feasible on site could be installed at a more feasible location.
    6. Other creative or innovative alternatives proposed by the applicant.
    Upon review and recommendation by the Chief Building Official, areas associated with these buildings or structures that are critical to pedestrian ingress, egress, or life safety may, at the discretion of the Board of County Commissioners, be exempted from REMP payments for all or a portion of the area snowmelted.

 

Confluence Architecture & Sustainability can help with REMP calculations and provide all the documentation, modeling, testing and certification required to navigate the code.

Jump to Energy Conservation Code Hub for; the western slope of Colorado; Aspen, Telluride, Mountain Village, Town of Snowmass Village, Basalt, Carbondale, Pitkin and Eagle County…

 

Carbondale’s new Energy Code adoption

Beginning the 1st of July 2020, The Town of Carbondale revised their REBP (Residential Efficient Building Program). Carbondale is currently on the 2009 IRC (International Residential Code), the 2012 IgCC (International Green Construction Code) and the 2015 IECC (International Energy Conservation Code).

Residential

Link to REBP guidelines and REBP checklist here…

Carbondale has adopted the 2015 IECC and has a REBP (Residential Efficient Building Program). The chart below is the crux of understanding the energy code compliance.

What are the submittal requirements? Let me try and unpack what this chart means. Carbondale has made solar PV mandatory in almost all cases. The Building Official has unofficially made continuous wall insulation mandatory. Handicapping a HERS Rating this way, pretty much destroys the effectiveness of the tool. But against my strident protest, they followed CORE down this path. PV installers rejoice! Window salesmen- call your lawyer.

I think this lopsided push for PV is born out of COREs mission to electrify all houses. And why not PV? Because- the point of doing an energy model is to find the most cost-effective path to a set goal. If you declare PV the winner without a fight, you have cheated the science, tipped the scales. PV is pretty great, when would it really matter? When glazing becomes a large portion of the envelope load. When does that happen? Remodels obviously. The math might show that the old windows should really be replaced for reasons of heat loss, service life, comfort, etc. but, the project has already blown it’s wad on a PV system, got all the points they need, window replacement off the table. Another time glazing becomes overwhelmingly important- large areas of glazing facing south or west. I routinely see custom homes in River Valley Ranch with more than 30% glazing factor (30% of the above grade walls are made from glass). In these homes getting the right kind of glazing is huge. Sometimes the SHGC is more dominate than the U-factor! These southern view window walls are the only reason some of these houses require air conditioning. Also, a blind favoritism towards PV will stifle development/implementation of other kinds of renewable energy production, sorry GSHP, thermal solar and Drain Water Heat Recovery. Same argument for CI on the walls. The code does not make CI mandatory, I think, because flexibility is good, and CI can easily be traded off for better performance elsewhere. Ranch style houses typically have more roof area than walls area, why not make CI on the roof mandatory? It would move the needle more. And on the roof, you don’t even have all the technical problems with fenestration openings, siding and stone veneer attachment, etc. CI has many wonderful benefits, and I recommend it for most jobs, but it is rarely the first most cost-effective way to conserve energy. Ok, I’m getting off the soapbox, on with the submittal requirements…

I’m told the “percent better than code” row should be stricken from this chart; it no longer applies.

I’m told the “(option)” under the Tier 1 column means that a less than 2000 square foot house can submit using the prescriptive path as long as 1.5 watts per square foot of PV is provided. I don’t understand why, but they also require a Total UA Compliance calculation to be performed and submitted. No requirement to perform over basic compliance, so it just equal to prescriptive anyway. Or submit a Projected HERS rating of 50 in lieu, PV or not.

So basically what Carbondale is saying is that the prescriptive (402.1), the performance path (405) and ERI (406) are not a compliance option. Every single project will have to submit at least a Total UA Compliance Calculation (402.1.5), and PV design showing 1.5 watts per square foot or a HERS rating.

Currently, the Town is not considering ADUs (Accessory Dwelling Units) as their own unit. No need to include in REBP submittal, HERS rating or blower door infiltration test.

The required points refer to the REBP checklist (an Excel spreadsheet). Points are earned by including features in the house like, efficient framing, water conservation, chemical reduction, etc. Refer to the guidelines to understand how to fill out the checklist. Extra points are awarded for above code HERS (Home Energy Rating Score), infiltration rates and solar. Confluence can perform these tests and produce these compliance reports. Please call us early in the process so we can help you optimize the insulation and comply with the energy code in the most cost-effective way.

Commercial

Carbondale is on the 2009 IBC (International Building Code), but they have also adopted the 2012 IgCC (International Energy Conservation Code).

Link to Carbondale’s heavily amended adoption of the IgCC here…

Navigating the IgCC is a deep subject, but expect it touch every phase of your project. The code requires above IECC insulation and infiltration mitigation, construction waste tracking and structured plumbing. The code requires third-party inspections and testing for the envelope. Confluence has been the code compliance and envelope consultant for six IgCC projects now. The Town of Snowmass Village has also adopted this code. Please calls us early in the process if you are planning a commercial project in The Town of Carbondale or The Town of Snowmass Village.

Jump to ICC’s overview of the International Green Construction Code…

Jump to Energy Conservation Code Hub for; the western slope of Colorado; Aspen, Telluride, Mountain Village, Town of Snowmass Village, Basalt, Carbondale, Pitkin and Eagle County…